Punctuality.

In this article, media professionals can find background information on punctuality. 

Every day, well over a million passengers and more than two hundred thousand tonnes of freight travel on board of more than ten thousand trains along the SBB rail network. The Swiss railway network is one of the busiest in the world. Even small, everyday disruptions can have far-reaching effects for our complex railway system.

To ensure that punctuality remains high in the future, SBB is currently reviewing its service offer planning, railway production and construction projects. This work is undertaken in close coordination with the Cantons, the Conférence des transports de la Suisse occidentale (CTSO) and the Federal Office of Transport (FOT).

Punctuality during the first half of 2022.

For the first half of 2022, the punctuality figures are better than in the first half of 2021, despite there being more passengers (+50% during peak hours for long-distance services and +29% for regional service), numerous special event trains and extensive maintenance and construction work. Train punctuality is 93.1%, which is above our target (90.5%), though there is a downward trend. 

Connection punctuality was exactly on target (98.8%) for the first half of the year. This is an indication of increased tension in the railway system. 

Here’s how SBB measures punctuality.

For SBB, train punctuality and connection punctuality are of utmost importance. Train punctuality measures the percentage of all trains which are on time. A train is considered on time if it reaches its destination with less than three minutes’ delay.  Connection punctuality measures the percentage of connections reached. SBB therefore considers the fact that some passengers miss connections when a train has less than three minutes’ delay and is still counted as on time.

As part of the ‘open data’ strategy, the industry publishes a large amount of data, including data on the punctuality of trains. Examples can be found on the Open data platform for mobility in Switzerland.